Calendar

Apr
24
Tue
Produce Safety Alliance Train the Trainer
Apr 24 – Apr 25 all-day

Cornell Cooperative Extension of Broome County, in cooperation with the Produce Safety Alliance, is hosting a Produce Safety Alliance Train the Trainer Course on Wednesday April 25th & Thursday April 26th.

Location: Agricultural Development Center/Cornell Cooperative Extension of Broome County (840 Upper Front St, Binghamton, NY)

Hotel: Closest accommodations are a Fairfield Inn, about .2 miles away from our location. Their phone number is (607) 651-1000.

Who Should Attend: Produce safety educators and others who work with fruit and vegetable growers who are interested in becoming PSA Trainers or PSA Lead Trainers. Those who become a PSA Trainer or PSA Lead Trainer are able to offer the PSA standardized curriculum to train fresh produce growers to meet the regulatory requirements in the FDA’s Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) Produce Safety Rule. This curriculum was developed through a nationwide collaboration including produce growers, extension educators, researchers, produce industry representatives, and government personnel.

What Should I Expect: This two-day course will provide detailed information about Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs), co-management of natural resources and food safety, FSMA Produce Safety Rule requirements, and a review of the seven module PSA Grower Training curriculum. The course will also cover principles of adult education, how to incorporate the PSA curriculum into other extension trainings, developing working partnerships, expectations for trainers, and how to register a PSA Grower Training Course with the Association of Food and Drug Officials (AFDO).

What Does Completion of this Course Mean: Upon successful completion of the full, two-day PSA TTT, you will be a PSA Trainer. Completing this training allows you to deliver curriculum modules as a trainer in a PSA Grower Training, under the direction of a PSA Lead Trainer. Every PSA Grower Training must have at least one PSA Lead Trainer present. Anyone presenting at a PSA Grower Training must be, at minimum, a PSA Trainer.

Cost: $75 per person for Organizations/Agencies included in the NECAFS region (CT, DE, MA, MD, ME, NH, NJ, NY, PA, RI, VT, WV); $125 for outside of the region

NYS Department of Agriculture & Markets is supporting the attendance of NYS entities, NECAFS is supporting the attendance of those in the region, but outside of NYS.

–> this includes all meals, PSA educational materials for trainers ($75 value) and a Certificate of Course Attendance issued by AFDO ($50 value).

Apr
25
Wed
Go Figure: The Fashion Silhouette & the Female Form
Apr 25 @ 8:00 AM – 8:00 PM

Curated by Rachel Doran (’19), “Go Figure: The Fashion Silhouette & the Female Form” explores perceptions and representations of Euro-American beauty ideals across the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries. Through outerwear and undergarments, this historical costume exhibition shows how women’s bodies have been manipulated and shaped to fit fashionable silhouettes at different moments in time. From corsetry and girdles to diet and exercise, shaping the human body is critical to fashion change and illustrates the fluctuating and dynamic nature of socio-cultural conceptions of “beauty.” Funded by the Charlotte Jirousek Undergraduate Research Fellowship in the Cornell Costume and Textile Collection and located on Level T of the Human Ecology Building.

Produce Safety Alliance: Train the Trainer Course
Apr 25 @ 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Cornell Cooperative Extension of Broome County, in cooperation with the Produce Safety Alliance, is hosting a Produce Safety Alliance Train the Trainer Course on Wednesday April 25th & Thursday April 26th.

Location: Agricultural Development Center/Cornell Cooperative Extension of Broome County (840 Upper Front St, Binghamton, NY)

Hotel: Closest accommodations are a Fairfield Inn, about .2 miles away from our location. Their phone number is (607) 651-1000.

Who Should Attend: Produce safety educators and others who work with fruit and vegetable growers who are interested in becoming PSA Trainers or PSA Lead Trainers. Those who become a PSA Trainer or PSA Lead Trainer are able to offer the PSA standardized curriculum to train fresh produce growers to meet the regulatory requirements in the FDA’s Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) Produce Safety Rule. This curriculum was developed through a nationwide collaboration including produce growers, extension educators, researchers, produce industry representatives, and government personnel.

What Should I Expect: This two-day course will provide detailed information about Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs), co-management of natural resources and food safety, FSMA Produce Safety Rule requirements, and a review of the seven module PSA Grower Training curriculum. The course will also cover principles of adult education, how to incorporate the PSA curriculum into other extension trainings, developing working partnerships, expectations for trainers, and how to register a PSA Grower Training Course with the Association of Food and Drug Officials (AFDO).

What Does Completion of this Course Mean: Upon successful completion of the full, two-day PSA TTT, you will be a PSA Trainer. Completing this training allows you to deliver curriculum modules as a trainer in a PSA Grower Training, under the direction of a PSA Lead Trainer. Every PSA Grower Training must have at least one PSA Lead Trainer present. Anyone presenting at a PSA Grower Training must be, at minimum, a PSA Trainer.

Cost: $75 per person for Organizations/Agencies included in the NECAFS region (CT, DE, MA, MD, ME, NH, NJ, NY, PA, RI, VT, WV); $125 for outside of the region

NYS Department of Agriculture & Markets is supporting the attendance of NYS entities, NECAFS is supporting the attendance of those in the region, but outside of NYS.

–> this includes all meals, PSA educational materials for trainers ($75 value) and a Certificate of Course Attendance issued by AFDO ($50 value).

Drawing the Line: 150 Years of European Artists on Paper @ Johnson Museum of Art
Apr 25 @ 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM

This exhibition highlights the variety of drawings from the Johnson Museum’s permanent collection by European artists from the 19th to the mid-20th century, including landscape and cityscape, portraiture, allegory, abstract, and whimsical sketches.

Museums collect such works for their beauty, their potential as teaching tools, to demonstrate how they relate to the larger body of an artist’s genre, and what they can tell us about the world as a whole, culturally, historically, and artistically. Drawing the Line explores work by some of the best-known artists of this medium: 19th-century masters Thomas Rowlandson, Richard Parkes Bonington, Eugène Delacroix, Edward Burne-Jones, Émile Schuffenecker, and the expatriates John Singer Sargent and James Abbott McNeill Whistler, with twentieth-century examples by Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, Paul Klee, Egon Schiele, and others.

This exhibition was curated by Nancy E. Green, the Gale and Ira Drukier Curator of European and American Art, Prints & Drawings, 1800–1945, at the Johnson Museum, and is supported in part by the Donald and Maria Cox Exhibition Endowment.

“Understanding balancing selection for aflatoxin production in Aspergillus flavus: insects, soil microbes, and population structure”- Milton Drott
Apr 25 @ 12:20 PM – 1:20 PM

Milton Drott
Graduate Student Exit Seminar, PPPMB, Cornell University

Research Focus

Aflatoxin is the most potent mycotoxin known—it is the most tightly regulated mycotoxin by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Aflatoxin is produced by a few species in the genus Aspergillus (section Flavi), and contaminates maize, peanuts, cottonseed, tree nuts, and other seed crops. The long-term goal of my research is to reduce aflatoxin contamination in food by understanding the significance of aflatoxin in the ecology of Aspergillus flavus, the most common aflatoxin-producing species. My overarching hypothesis is that aflatoxin confers a fitness advantage to A. flavus under some conditions, but not others. More specifically, variation in selection for or against aflatoxin under different conditions maintains polymorphism in aflatoxin production in A. flavus, and explains the prevalence of naturally occurring A. flavus individuals that do not produce aflatoxin (referred to hereafter as nontoxigenic isolates). My goal, therefore, is to understand the ecological factors that select for and against aflatoxin production in agricultural systems. Ultimately I hope to get a better understanding of the ecological significance of A. flavus secondary metabolism in general, and may contribute to the improvement of biological control efforts for reducing aflatoxin contamination of agricultural products.

Ana Teresa Fernández: Magic Informalism: [Re]drawing Solutions to Alternative Truths
Apr 25 @ 4:30 PM – 5:30 PM

Born in Tampico, Mexico, in 1981, artist Ana Teresa Fernández lives and works in San Francisco. Her work explores the politics of intersectionality through temporalized actions and social gestures, many of which she translates into masterful oil paintings, video installation, and other mixed media. Performance is also a critical tool of investigation in her art practice, often imbued with feminist undercurrents that flow together in post-colonial enunciations and representations. Responding to space, time, and locations, Fernández illuminates the psychological and physical barriers that confine human beings to identities of gender, race, and class, as well as other social constructs that are enforced in the U.S. and the global South. Fernández has exhibited at the Denver Art Museum, the Nevada Museum of Art of Reno, Arizona State University Art Museum in Phoenix, the Grunwald Gallery at Indiana University in Bloomington, the Tijuana Biennial, the Snite Museum at Notre Dame University, the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco, and the Oakland Art Museum in Oakland, California. Her large-scale 5W public art project in San Francisco was awarded “Best of the Bay” by 7×7 magazine in 2013. She received the Tournesol Award from the Headlands Center for the Arts and her films have been screened at festivals including MADRID International Film Festival in Madrid, Spain; the Claremont Film Festival in Claremont-Ferrand, France; the International Frauen Film Festival of Dortmund, Germany; the Female Eye Film Festival in Toronto; the San Diego Latino Film Festival in California; and the Honolulu Film Festival of Hawaii. Fernánadez lectures at the San Francisco Art Institute.

Sponsored by the Mellon Collaborative Studies in Architecture, Urbanism, and the Humanities through the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Latina/o Studies Program, American Studies Program, the Society for the Humanities, the Department of English, and the College of Architecture, Art, and Planning at Cornell University.

Slave Owners of West Africa: Decision Making in the Age of Abolition
Apr 25 @ 4:30 PM – 5:30 PM

By the end of World War One, most of West Africa found themselves colonized by either France, Britain, Germany or Portugal. One aspect of colonial rule was the abolition of slavery.

In a Chats in the Stacks book talk, Professor Sandra Greene will present her new book Slave Owners of West Africa (Indiana University Press, May, 2017).

By exploring the lives of three prominent West African slave owners during the age of abolition, she attempts to understand why these individuals reacted to the demise of slavery as they did. Greene emphasizes the notion that the decisions made by these individuals were deeply influenced by their personalities, desires to protect their economic and social status, and their insecurities and sympathies for wives, friends, and other associates. She will discuss why so many made the decisions they did and how and why the institution of indigenous slavery continues to influence social relations in West Africa today.

Sandra E. Greene is the Stephen ’59 and Madeline ’60 Anbinder Professor of African History in the Department of History at Cornell.

This event is sponsored by Olin Library.

CFEM Seminar: Lakshithe Wagalath (IESEG) – Risk Management for Whales
Apr 25 @ 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM

Please register at https://cornell.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_6y7MdIv1Pc2h8pv.

We propose a portfolio risk model which integrates market risk with liquidation costs. The model provides a framework for computing liquidation-adjusted risk measures such as Liquidation-adjusted VaR (LVaR). Calculation of liquidation-adjusted Value-at-Risk (LVaR) for simulated and real-life examples reveals a substantial impact of liquidation costs on portfolio risk for portfolios with large concentrated positions. This is joint work with Rama Cont.

Bio: Lakshithe Wagalath is associate professor at IESEG School of Management, Paris. His research focuses on the mathematical modeling of endogenous risk and systemic risk in financial markets and the development of tools for monitoring price-mediated contagion from fire sales and financial stability. He graduated from École Polytechnique, Paris, and holds a Ph.D. in mathematics from Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris.

Science on Tap: Vaccines: from history to controversy
Apr 25 @ 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Graduate Women in Science present “Science on Tap”! Aimed to make science accessible and exciting to everyone, we will bring a diverse set of speakers studying a range of research topics from Cornell into the community who will strive to present their research in an authentic but also engaging and understandable way.

So, come grab a drink, sit back, relax and join us this month for:

“Vaccines: from history to controversy”

Prof Cynthia Leifer will tell the the tale of why and how vaccines were developed, how they work and what is in them. Dr. Leifer will also explain the science behind what we know about their safety and efficacy.

Apr
26
Thu
Go Figure: The Fashion Silhouette & the Female Form
Apr 26 @ 8:00 AM – 8:00 PM

Curated by Rachel Doran (’19), “Go Figure: The Fashion Silhouette & the Female Form” explores perceptions and representations of Euro-American beauty ideals across the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries. Through outerwear and undergarments, this historical costume exhibition shows how women’s bodies have been manipulated and shaped to fit fashionable silhouettes at different moments in time. From corsetry and girdles to diet and exercise, shaping the human body is critical to fashion change and illustrates the fluctuating and dynamic nature of socio-cultural conceptions of “beauty.” Funded by the Charlotte Jirousek Undergraduate Research Fellowship in the Cornell Costume and Textile Collection and located on Level T of the Human Ecology Building.

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